Multifactor Authentication for the Mainframe?

Is the password is dead or dying?

Lots of articles talk about the death of passwords. Google aims to kill them off by the end of 2017. According to the company, Android users will soon be able to log in to services using a combination of face, typing, and movement patterns. Apple figured this out long ago (Apple Pay) and continues to move away from passwords. Even the U.S. government is coming to grips with the fact that passwords don’t cut it anymore.

Enter multifactor authentication or MFA. Almost everyone agrees that MFA provides the strongest level of authentication (who you are) possible. It’s great for users, too. My iPhone is a great example. While I like many things about it, Touch ID is my favorite feature. I never have to remember my thumb print (it’s always with me), and no one can steal it (except James Bond). Touch ID makes secure access so easy.

Given the riskiness of passwords and the rise of MFA solutions, I have to ask why it’s still okay to rely on passwords for mainframe access. Here’s my guess: This question has never occurred to many mainframe system admins because there’s never been any other way to authenticate host access—especially for older mainframe applications.

 Are mainframe passwords secure?

When you think about passwords, it’s clear that the longer and more complex the password, the more secure it will be. But mainframe applications—especially those written decades ago, the ones that pretty much run your business—were hardcoded to use only weak eight-character, case-insensitive passwords.  Ask any IT security person if they think these passwords provide adequate protection for mission-critical applications and you will get a resounding “No way!”

As far as anyone knows, though, they’ve been the only option available. Until now. At Micro Focus, we are bridging the old and the new, helping our digitally empowered customers to innovate faster, with less risk. One of our latest solutions provides a safe, manageable, economical way for you to use multifactor authentication to authorize mainframe access for all your users—from employees to business partners.

Multifactor authentication to authorize mainframe access?

It’s a logical solution because it uses any of our modern terminal emulatorsthe tool used for accessing host applications—and a newer product called Host Access Management and Security Server (MSS). Working alongside your emulator, MSS makes it possible for you to say goodbye to mainframe passwords, or reinforce them with other authentication options. In fact, you can use up to 14 different types of authentication methods—from smart cards and mobile text-based verification codes to fingerprint and retina scans. You’re free to choose the best solution for your business.

In addition to strengthening security, there’s another big benefit that can come with multifactor authentication for host systems: No more passwords means no more mainframe password-reset headaches!

Yes, it’s finally possible to give your mainframe applications the same level of protection your other applications enjoy. Using MFA for your mainframes brings them into the modern world of security. You’ll get rid of your password headaches and be better equipped to comply with industry and governmental regulations. All you need is a little “focus”—Micro Focus.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *