Is Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP) Its Own Worst Enemy?

At Micro Focus, our customers are asking for a holistic approach to secure file transfer—one that provides more visibility, flexibility, and control. That’s why we’ve introduced Reflection® for Secure IT Gateway. This new SSH-based solution sits between the user and the SFTP server, and acts as a central point of control. Its job is to track every file going in and out of your enterprise, including who transferred it and what’s in it. David Fletcher investigates further in this blog….

Secure File Transfer Protocol

SFTP has long been a de facto standard for secure file transfer.  Originally designed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), this extension of the Secure Shell protocol (SSH) 2.0 provides secure file transfer capabilities over the SSH network protocol.

In a nutshell, SFTP encrypts your data and moves it through an impenetrable encrypted tunnel that makes interception and decoding virtually impossible. While incredibly useful for business-to-business data sharing, SFTP poses a problem in our security-conscious world. Oddly enough, the problem is that SFTP works too well.

Let me explain. SFTP works so well that no one can see what’s being transferred—not even the people who need to see it for security reasons. Case in point: Edward Snowden. No matter what your thoughts on the subject, the fact is that Snowden used his privileged user status to transfer and steal sensitive files. Why was he able to do this? Because no one could see what he was doing. As a “privileged user” on the network, he had extensive access to sensitive files—files that he was able to transfer about, as he desired, without detection.

Iris2blog

In addition to the threats posed by unscrupulous privileged users, there’s another threat that’s cause for alarm. It’s called Advanced Persistent Threat (APT).  Basically, an APT is a ceaseless, sophisticated attack carried out by an organized group to accomplish a particular result—typically, the acquisition of information. The classic APT mode of operation is to doggedly steal the credentials of privileged users. The purpose, of course, is to gain unfettered access to sensitive or secret data. Once “in,” these APTers can transfer data and steal it without detection.  On a side note, Snowden used some of these APT tactics to steal credentials and validate self-signed certificates to gain access to classified documents.

APTs are often discussed in the context of government, but let me be clear: Companies are also a primary target. Take the recent Wall Street Journal article about a foreign government stealing plans for a new steel technology from US Steel. Such behavior is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to how far some entities will go to steal information and technology.

Introducing Micro Focus Reflection for Secure IT Gateway

So given that transferring files is an essential business operation, what can you do to protect your organization from these dangerous threats? At Micro Focus, our customers are asking for a holistic approach to secure file transfer—one that provides more visibility, flexibility, and control. That’s why we’re introducing Reflection® for Secure IT Gateway. This new SSH-based solution sits between the user and the SFTP server, and acts as a central point of control. Its job is to track every file going in and out of your enterprise, including who transferred it and what’s in it.   It also provides the ability to essentially offload files and allow for 3rd party inspection and can then either stop the transfer and notify if something seem amiss or complete the transfer as required.

Reflection for Secure IT Gateway comes with a powerful browser-based interface that you can use to accomplish a number of transfer-related tasks:

  • Expose files for inspection by third-party tools
  • Automate pre- and post-transfer actions
  • Grant and manage SFTP administrator rights
  • Provision users
  • Configure transfers
  • Create jobs for enterprise level automation
  • Delegate tasks

Read more about Reflection for Secure IT Gateway or download our evaluation software and take a test drive. Learn how you can continue to benefit from the ironclad security of SFTP while also gaining greater file transfer visibility, flexibility, and control.

RUMBA9.4.5
Sr. Product Marketing Manager
Host Connectivity
(Orginally Published here)

It ain’t broke, but there’s still a better way

The latest release of Rumba+ Desktop now offers centralized security and management via Host Access Management and Security Server (MSS). MSS meets one of IT’s greatest challenges—keeping up with an ever-changing IT security landscape. David Fletcher covers better secure access to host systems in this blog.

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

We’ve all heard the old adage  But here’s the thing: Even if it’s not broken, it could be better. Think about regular film versus digital? Rotary phones versus smartphones? Those electric football games that vibrated the players across the field versus Xbox?  All the early versions worked just fine. They delivered the same results as their new counterparts. So why did we upgrade?

The answer is obvious. We wanted a better experience. After all, what’s not to like about achieving the same thing with less effort, achieving more with less effort, improving results, or just having more fun along the way?

The same is true for software. Remember the early days of running a single application in DOS? Think back to how clunky and inefficient those applications were. Yet we thought they were amazing!

These days there’s another topic that is top-of-mind in the software world, and that is the topic of computer security. While an older version of your software may still accomplish the task it was designed for, the world in which that software lives has undergone radical change. Software designed ten years ago isn’t able to shield your enterprise against the sophisticated threats of today. The gap is vast and dangerous.

rumsec

Micro Focus and The Attachmate Group

Change comes when the benefits of a new solution outweighs the risk or pain of change. The good news is that change has come to Micro Focus® Rumba+ Desktop. The merger of Micro Focus and The Attachmate Group is enabling customers of both Rumba and Reflection terminal emulation software to get the best of both worlds. That’s why there are big gains to be had by updating now.

Let me be more specific. The latest release of Rumba+ Desktop now offers centralized security and management via Host Access Management and Security Server (MSS).  MSS meets one of IT’s greatest challenges—keeping up with an ever-changing IT security landscape. Customers always say, “We have 1000s of desktops at 100s of global locations. How do we keep up with PCI DSS, SHA-2, and TLS standards? How can we keep all of our clients up-to-date and secure? Just when we get everything updated, something new comes along that requires touching all of those workstations again.”

Rumba+ with Host Access Management and Security Server

Well, Rumba+ Desktop combined with Host Access Management and Security Server solves the problem.  Together, these products make it possible for you to:

  • Take centralized control of your host-access operations. You can lock down 100s (or 1000s) of desktops with ease, control access using your Identity and Access Management system (yes, it’s possible), and grant or deny access based on group or role. You can quickly apply changes to align with business needs or make post-install adjustments. And you can do it on your schedule, not someone else’s.
  • Reinforce security as you remove the need for mainframe passwords. By teaming Rumba+ Desktop with MSS, you can integrate your host systems with your existing IAM system. Then you can replace weak eight-character passwords with strong complex ones. You can even banish mainframe passwords—and password-reset headaches—by automatically signing users on to their mainframe applications.
  • Build a wall of security in front of your host. You can deliver end-to-end encryption and enforce access control at the perimeter with a patented security proxy. You can also enable multifactor authentication to authorize access to your host systems—which means you can take complete control of who is accessing your most valuable assets.

Micro Focus terminal emulation products have been providing secure access to host systems for decades. As technology advances and the security landscape continues to change, you can count on Micro Focus to help you find a better way.

RUMBA9.4.5
Sr. Product Marketing Manager
Host Connectivity
(Orginally Published here)

Browser-Based Terminal Emulation and the Java Plug-In—What You Need to Know

The death of the Java plug-in is not news. Lots of articles talk about it. Even Oracle (who makes the Java plug-in) has finally agreed to dump it. For many users and businesses, this is not a big deal. And for IT staff, it’s actually a relief. It means they’ll no longer have to deal with the annoying Java Runtime Environment (JRE). The question for many IT Departments right now is this: “What’s your plan to transition off the Java plug-in for terminal emulation access?” David Fletcher looks at some answers…..

The death of the Java plug-in is not news. Lots of articles talk about it. Even Oracle (who makes the Java plug-in) has finally agreed to dump it. For many users and businesses, this is not a big deal. And for IT staff, it’s actually a relief. It means they’ll no longer have to deal with the annoying Java Runtime Environment (JRE).

It wasn’t always this way. In the beginning, IT saw Java as a way to build enterprise applications that could be run without installation, updates, or device-specific requirements. But naturally, there’s a tradeoff: You must install and maintain some notoriously problematic software—the Java Runtime Environment (JRE)—on all participating devices. That’s one big maintenance and security headache for IT. Basically, it reintroduces the very problem that Java was originally supposed to solve.

Enter HTML5/JavaScript. The HTML5/JavaScript approach requires no device-specific components beyond a modern browser. IT staff can serve up web applications to hundreds or thousands of users without having to touch any user devices. They need only maintain a dozen or so application servers. Goodbye endpoint-management headaches!

An often overlooked application that uses the Java plug-in is the browser-based terminal emulator. For many medium to large companies, as well as numerous government agencies, terminal emulators are a mission-critical necessity. For years, these applications have used the Java plug-in to provide access to mainframes and other host systems from within a browser that supports the plug-in.

Rumba+What’s your plan to transition off the Java plug-in for terminal emulation access?

It’s a question you may have to grapple with sooner rather than later because of the release of Windows 10. More and more companies are looking to move to this new platform. But the Edge browser that comes with it does not support Java plug-ins. Yes, you can run IE on Windows 10, but essentially you are poking holes in your secure browser-based access by using this older technology.  Not to mention the headaches that IT will continue to have when applying security updates, which Oracle won’t continue to support forever.

There is an easy solution. Micro Focus now offers Reflection ZFE, a terminal emulator built on the advanced technology of HTML5. With Reflection ZFE, you can deliver browser-based host access efficiently and securely with a true zero-footprint client designed to reduce IT costs and desktop management time.

Our 2.0 release of Reflection ZFE delivers many great new features, including support for:

  • Unisys hosts (UTS)
  • IND$FILE
  • Windows 10 Enterprise
  • Automated sign-on for mainframe applications
  • Reflection for the Web Profile Import
  • VBA and VBA macros

Learn more about our HTML5 terminal emulation solution.

RUMBA9.4.5
Sr. Product Marketing Manager
Host Connectivity
(Originally published here)

„End of Life“ – Opportunismus der Hersteller – die Zeche zahlt der Kunde

Die Hersteller Aussage “End of Life” bedeutet nie etwas Gutes. Auch wenn dies oftmals kein direktes und abruptes Ende des Produktes zur Folge hat, so sind die hieraus für Kunden resultierenden Konsequenzen oftmals gravierend und weitreichend: Investitionen müssen getätigt werden die nicht budgetiert waren und Kapazitäten werden gebunden – wichtige Initiativen zur Unterstützung der Unternehmensziele werden dadurch verzögert oder bleiben gänzlich auf der Strecke. Lesen Sie im neusten Blogbeitrag, warum am Ende der Kunde die Zeche für den Hersteller Opportunismus zahlen muss und welche Alternativen es gibt.

„End of Life“ bedeutet in der Regel nie etwas Gutes. Im Kontext der Hersteller beziehungsweise Produktzyklen bezeichnet es die Endstufe im Leben eines Produktes; für die Kunden ergibt sich hieraus oftmals ein ungewollter Handlungszwang. Die schnelle Entwicklung von Technologien, stetig wachsender Wettbewerbsdruck sowie die Nachfrage beeinflussen den Zeitpunkt des End of Life eines Produktes genauso wie der Aufwand seitens der Hersteller, verschiedene Produktversionen stets aktualisiert auf dem Markt vorzuhalten. Insbesondere letzteres bindet viele Kapazitäten und beeinträchtigt zudem die Fähigkeit schnell auf neue Kundenanforderungen zu reagieren und Innovationen voranzutreiben. Unter diesem Gesichtspunkt scheint es durchaus verständlich, dass jedes hergestellte Produkt irgendwann das Ende des Lebenszyklus erreicht, oder durch eine Weiterentwicklung oder ein neues Produkt ersetzt wird. Doch gerade in der IT-Branche stellt man neben den bereits genannten Aspekten weitere Motivationsgründe seitens der Hersteller fest, Produkte auslaufen zu lassen. Immer öfter sind nicht nur einzelne Produkte sondern vielmehr ganze Produktlinien dem „End-of-life“ Prozess unterworfen und das ist oftmals dem reinen Opportunismus der Software Hersteller geschuldet. So sind es häufig betriebswirtschaftliche Überlegungen der Hersteller – sei es, dass  Produktlinien nicht länger als strategisch wertvoll betrachtet werden, oder man in anderen Bereichen kurzfristig bessere Wachstums- und Ertragschancen für das eigene Unternehmen sieht – die zur  Einstellung von Produkten führen. Auch wenn die Hersteller-Aussage „End of Life“ meist keine abruptes Ende für das Produkt zur Folge hat, es vielmehr schleichend kommt, so sind die hieraus für Kunden resultierenden Konsequenzen oftmals gravierend und weitreichend: Investitionen müssen getätigt werden die nicht budgetiert waren und Kapazitäten werden gebunden – wichtige Initiativen zur Unterstützung der Unternehmensziele werden dadurch verzögert oder bleiben gänzlich auf der Strecke. Bisweilen diktieren Hersteller mit derartigen Entscheidungen ihren Kunden gar die strategische Ausrichtung der IT – das kann nicht im Interesse des Kunden sein.

Beispiele gibt es genügend – gerade Microsoft hat Kunden in den letzten Jahren mit dem ein oder anderen strategischen Hakenschlag seine Agenda aufgezwungen. So hat die Abkündigung des Microsoft Small Business Servers 2011 im Jahr 2013 ein Kundensegment betroffen, in dem IT-Resourcen besonders knapp und unnötige Aufwände damit umso schmerzhafter sind. Als Alternative bietet Microsoft den Windows Server 2012 Essentials an – der bietet allerdings nur Datei- und Druckdienste. Wer Exchange nicht aus der Cloud nutzen will, muss für den Betrieb seines Mail-Systems einen zusätzlichen Server anschaffen. Die Entscheidung ob ein Unternehmen seine IT in Teilen oder in Gänze in die Cloud verlagert ist jedoch primär eine Frage der Unternehmens- und IT-Strategie, die wohl überlegt sein will. Manchen Unternehmen ist es bereits aus Gründen des Datenschutzes nicht möglich in die Cloud zu gehen, für andere ist es schlicht nicht die richtige Lösung. Dennoch werden all diese Anwender durch die unternehmerische Entscheidung eines einzelnen IT-Lieferanten zum Handeln gezwungen. Glück im Unglück, dass die rasante Entwicklung in der IT für Kunden vor allen Dingen eines geschaffen hat: Alternativen.

PE

Es gibt jedoch auch positive Beispiele anderer Hersteller, die eindrucksvoll beweisen, dass in etablierte und von Kunden geschätzte Produkte investiert und diese stetig an veränderte Marktgegebenheiten und Anforderungen angepasst werden. Micro Focus hat es sich zum Ziel gesetzt Unternehmen dabei zu unterstützen innovativ zu bleiben ohne Risiken einzugehen. Eine unserer wichtigsten Aufgaben ist es dabei, unseren Kunden eine Brücke zu bauen, die bewährte Technologien für heutige und zukünftige Anforderungen rüstet – denn immer wenn uns das gelingt, ersparen wir unseren Kunden die erheblichen Aufwände und Risiken die mit Architekturwechseln verbunden sind. So verfügen Novell NetWare-Kunden die dem Druck zur Standardisierung auf Microsoft widerstanden haben Heute mit dem Micro Focus Open Enterprise Server über eine moderne, auf Enterprise Linux basierende Infrastruktur die Datei- und Druckdienste für stationäre wie mobile Anwender zuverlässig, effizient und sicher zur Verfügung stellt; Micro Focus COBOL-Kunden betreiben Anwendungen die vor Jahrzehnten geschrieben wurden Heute in der Cloud und stellen sie als Web Service mobilen Mitarbeitern und Endkunden zur Verfügung, ohne Millionen und Mannjahre in Neuentwicklungen oder die Implementierung und Anpassung von Standard-Software investiert zu haben; Host-Anwender bedienen 3270-Anwendungen auf ihrem Tablet und mit modernsten Benutzeroberflächen…Es gäbe noch viele Beispiele und die Liste wird sich fortschreiben, denn die Welt hört sich nicht auf zu drehen und wir werden nicht aufhören unseren Kunden Brücken in die Zukunft zu bauen. Auch für die von Microsoft zurückgelassenen Anwender der Small Business Suite haben wir übrigens eine Antwort: wechseln Sie auf die Linux-basierte Micro Focus Open Workgroup Suite.

Christoph

Christoph Stoica

Regional General Manager DACH

Vom Chaos zur Ordnung – was unaufgeräumte Kinderzimmer mit dem Berechtigungsmanagement zu tun haben

Die ungeliebte Aufgabe, Ordnung zu schaffen, gibt es nicht nur in Kinderzimmern. Auch in Unternehmen wird das „Aufräumen“ zum Beispiel in Bezug auf den Wildwuchs bei den Verzeichnisdiensten und im Berechtigungsmanagement eher als lästige und vor allem zeitraubende Pflicht angesehen. Die Folgen sind fatal und hoch riskant, denn unzulässige Berechtigungen oder verwaiste Konten bieten große Angriffsflächen für Datensabotage und -diebstahl. Götz Walecki zeigt mit seinem Blog Lösungen auf, wie man mittels Standardsoftware effizient innerhalb der der IT aufräumen kann.

Sommerzeit ist Ferienzeit –6 ½ Wochen bleiben die Schulen geschlossen und der Nachwuchs tobt sich angesichts des chronisch schlechten Wetters in diesem Sommer schonungslos in den Kinderzimmern aus. Hinter verschlossenen Türen, werden dann die Kisten mit Playmobil, Lego und diversen Puzzeln herausgekramt, umgestülpt und der Boden ist innerhalb kürzestes Zeit gänzlich mit Spielsachen bedeckt. Mit Schildern an den Zimmertüren wie „Sperrgebiet für Eltern“ oder „Zutritt verboten“ will der Nachwuchs die Eltern vor dem Betreten des Zimmers abhalten, denn auf den unweigerlich folgenden Satz „Jetzt räum doch mal dein Zimmer auf“ haben sie überhaupt keine Lust. Jeder von uns kennt diesen Satz nur allzu gut – sei es aus eigenen Kindheitstagen oder weil man ihn als seufzende Kapitulationserklärung gegenüber den eigenen Kindern selbst abgegeben hat. In aller Regel jedoch, vermutlich ebenfalls vertraut, zeigt dieser Satz ziemlich wenig Wirkung – das geliebte beziehungsweise ungeliebte Chaos bleibt. Doch die ungeliebte Aufgabe, Ordnung zu schaffen, gibt es nicht nur in Kinderzimmern. Auch in Unternehmen wird das „Aufräumen“ zum Beispiel in Bezug auf den Wildwuchs bei den Verzeichnisdiensten und im Berechtigungsmanagement eher als lästige und vor allem zeitraubende Pflicht angesehen. Viele Unternehmen pflegen die Zugangsberechtigungen für ihre Beschäftigten oft mehr schlecht als recht; nicht selten herrscht beim Thema Rechteverwaltung ein großes Durcheinander. Die Folgen sind unzulässige Berechtigungen oder verwaiste Konten. Aber gerade in einer Zeit, in der kompromittierte privilegierte Benutzerkonten das Einfallstor für Datensabotage oder -diebstahl sind, müssen Unternehmen dafür sorgen diese Angriffsflächen zu reduzieren, Risiken zu minimieren und Gegenmaßnahmen schnell einzuleiten. Hierfür werden intelligente Analysewerkzeuge benötigt auf deren Basis die richtigen Entscheidungen getroffen werden können.

Wie kann mittels Standardsoftware innerhalb der IT aufgeräumt werden?

Bei den Maßnahmen zur Prävention sollten Unternehmen daher Ihren Blick auf die Vereinfachung und Automatisierung von sogenannten Zugriffszertifizierungsprozessen richten, um Identity Governance Initiativen im Unternehmen zu etablieren. Die immer weiter zunehmende Digitalisierung mit all den unterschiedlichen Zugriffsmöglichkeiten auf sensible Daten und Systeme, sowie die Flexibilisierung der Arbeitsorganisation durch eine engere Einbindung von Partnern und Dienstleistern, schaffen einen unübersichtlichen Flickenteppich an Berechtigungen, der manuell kaum noch zu kontrollieren und zu überwachen ist.

Ordnung2

Die Analyse der Accounts und Berechtigungen, sowie eine Optimierung zum Beispiel im Bereich der Verzeichnisdienste, hilft Unternehmen nicht nur Sicherheitsrisiken, die beispielsweise durch verwaiste oder mit übermäßigen Berechtigungen ausgestattete Benutzerkonten entstehen, zu reduzieren, sondern trägt auch zu Kostenreduzierung bei. Denn jeder Nutzer zu viel kostet Geld und Sicherheit. Geschäftsleitung und Führungskräften benötigen Tools, die relevante Informationen bereitstellen, um Entscheidungen zu treffen, die das Risiko von Datenverlust reduzieren, Zugriffsberechtigungen auf das Nötigste beschränken und somit den an Unternehmen gestellten Anforderungen zur Datensicherheit genügen. Micro Focus bietet mit Access Review 2.0 eine flexible Lösung für diese Aufgabenstellung in puncto Attestierung und Rezertifizierung von Konten, Zugriffsrechten und Business Rollen.

Der Rezertifizierungsprozess ist dabei sehr anpassungsfähig und wird durch die Fokussierung auf Ausnahmen deutlich vereinfacht. Berichtsfunktionen mit vorkonfigurierten Berichten zu Berechtigungen, Zertifizierungsstatus, Anfragen/Genehmigungen und Regelverstößen, sowie Unterstützung für automatisierte Kampagnen ermöglichen eine deutliche Effizienzsteigerung der Governance und helfen bei der Kostenreduktion z.B. durch Identifikation und anschließender Entfernung verwaister Konten. Mit der Micro Focus Lösung sind Kunden in der Lage, jenseits der Verwaltung von Benutzerkonten den Benutzerzugriff auf programmatische, wiederhol- und nachweisbare Art und Weise tatsächlich zu regeln und somit die Angriffsfläche nachhaltig zu reduzieren.

Götz Walecki

Manager Systems Engineering

LV7A5495_1(1)

A week’s work experience at Micro Focus HQ

Student Matt Hudson reports back on a week’s work experience with Micro Focus at their Berkshire Headquarters in August 2016.

The Arrival

My week at Micro Focus started off with me looking upon a smallish office from the visitor’s carpark.

“Well there’s only a few parking spaces, there can’t be too many people working here…” I said to myself. Turns out I was wrong.

Upon entering the building I soon found out that looks can be deceiving; the Micro Focus HQ is quite like a TARDIS. Bigger on the inside and shaped like one too. The atrium is a sight to behold, 3 floors of office space, kitchens and meeting rooms. The centre of the building is large enough to hold several sofas, chairs, tables and a large, upside down elephant (of course).

ellie

I spent the morning with Customer Care, looking at the ins, outs and joys of customer service. This was followed by an afternoon with Tim overviewing the International Go-To-Market Strategy Organisation (as easy to get my head around as it is to say this department name with a mouthful of crisps).

Off Site

Despite the size of the main site, it’s overflowing with busy people and space is at a premium, meaning the Recruitment team for Micro Focus are based in a small office in an industrial unit at River Park, which is where I spent my second day. Here I joined in the task of recruiting new employees to Micro Focus via the use of countless emails and interviews.

I also attempted a personality assessment given to these new employees in which I found out I was quite unstable, contrary to what I’d thought of myself beforehand. I won’t take the results to heart.

Virtual Insanity

On my third day here, I was introduced to the concept of Virtual Machines over at Development. It sounds crazy but in short, it turns out we can split up computers into lots of smaller computers. I was given a tour of the large and super-powerful computer behind Development’s virtual machines which allows them to run any version of an Operating System on their computers to allow them to test different versions of software.

In the afternoon, I took a look at Pivot tables which are a neat little thing on Excel, they give the people in Sales a nice visualisation of data. One interesting thing I thing I found out was how easily data can be manipulated by graphs and charts; a bump on a line graph can become a mountain just by changing the scale of the axis!

Hard drives are not an easy business

Day four at Micro Focus gave me a useful insight into the world of IT support. Much of my time there was spent pondering over a laptop whose hard drive had corrupted. After hours of work the IT team managed to revive the machine (although little of the original laptop was left).

Tweet Machine

My last day here was spent with Mark in Social Media Marketing. I’ve been able to write this blog about my time here, while also putting my #skills to the #test by churning out Micro Focus related tweets (the record for a work experience student is 87 apparently, I’ve got a snowball’s chance in hell of beating it).

To conclude

So after going round most of the departments here I’ve gained a good insight into the world of office jobs. It’s been exhausting due to the amount of information I’ve had to take in but very enjoyable nonetheless! Thanks to everyone who tolerated me being around, now time to get back to Twitter. #getonwithit…

Matt.

(This is me at an Airshow – not at Micro Focus!)

Matt

Product Managers Unite!

Agile methodologies, DevOps practices and dedicated tools have improved collaboration, efficiency, and time to market for development teams. But the needs of product managers are often overlooked. Lenore Adam investigates Atlas in her first Micro Focus blog post, enjoy!

With dev, test, and biz teams, that is.  Thanks to a Micro Focus Atlas, product managers can now be at one with dev, test, and business teams.

Agile methodologies, DevOps practices and dedicated tools have improved collaboration, efficiency, and time to market for development teams. But the needs of product managers are often overlooked.

Capturing evolving customer needs and understanding the impact of these changes on schedules, resources, and budgets are what product managers do.  PMs are the voice of the customer for engineering, and the financial and business analyst for the executive committee.  But to do the job properly they need information in real time for insightful analysis.

  •  How will a new customer requirement impact the release cycle?
  • Which requirements caused the project timeline to slip?
  • How much development time was spent on a specific requirement?

This need for knowledge has driven the development of Micro Focus Atlas requirements management software. Let’s put Atlas to the test with a couple scenarios.

Your customers demand a new requirement. Development asks ‘exactly how badly do you need this?’

Product managers often have to evaluate trade-offs, like whether a new feature is worth a schedule delay.  They rely on data to support recommendations, but without good data, sound judgment is compromised.  One of my mentors used to chant ‘the data will show you the way’.  But how?

To begin with, you need your finger on the pulse of current activity.  Atlas creates a bi-directional link with DevOps and Agile tooling.  Customer requirements created in Atlas are sent to the Agile backlog, establishing a direct connection between customer requirements and the dispersed stories and tasks needed to execute that requirement. Automatic status updates of these activities are centralized back into Atlas and available for PMs. No black box of engineering activity, no need to interrupt busy engineering managers for updates.  Setting up the sync is pretty straightforward as these YouTube postings prove:

Syncing Atlas & Rally

Syncing Atlas & JIRA

Syncing TFS & Atlas

Now, with an eye on the future, use this data within the Atlas environment to develop a what-if planning scenario to evaluate options.  What would be the expected schedule impact if a new feature was included in the release?  Does the potential increase in revenue offset the expected schedule delay?  Linking engineering activities to customer requirements gives projects teams the tools needed to make better decisions.

atlas

So why did the schedule slip?

The execs promised the sales teams and customers a timely delivery. So what went wrong?  Feature creep?  Did specific features take significantly longer to execute than planned?

Use the Atlas Time Machine feature to clarify cause and effect.  Explain why the original estimate was so far off with historical tracking that summarizes which stories were added, removed, or updated and how this impacted schedule over time.

Leverage the data in Atlas for your project post mortem to make the next project even better.  Atlas project baselining is where the team hits ‘rewind’ to uncover the original project definition and scope. The version control identifies each change, the person who made it and any associated discussions for context.  For the multi-disciplinary team, this is an opportunity for an informed discussion and objective review after the whirlwind of development and release.

The hands-on executive – ‘hey, remember what happened the last time you did that?’ 

What happens when an executive bypasses the decision-making process?  Suddenly, a requirement ‘proposal’ becomes a new requirement, end of story.  True confession: we often padded our schedules and budgets with a line item affectionately labeled ‘friends of execs’ to factor in these unpredictable yet inevitable curve balls.

The trick is to view the schedule before and after the unplanned insertion in a previous project.  Was there a schedule slip – and if so, how bad was it?  Even understand the breadth of impact by using the Atlas Relationship Diagram to trace downstream requirements that may also have been impacted.

And here’s the killer data point you need to save the project from unhelpful top-floor intervention:  How much development time was chewed up by the requirement?  That said, Atlas just records the facts. You’ll need to draw on all your expert diplomacy skills to present them. Try ‘Just sayin’…’

Micro Focus Application Delivery and Testing   

Accelerated delivery.  Continuous quality.

Make Atlas your resource for uniting business, development, and test teams. And it doesn’t cost a cent to get started. Access a free cloud-based trial of Atlas 3.0 and start.

Schlaflos vor dem Bildschirm – der Super-Sportsommer 2016 biegt auf die Zielgrade ein!

Am 5. August ertönt der Startschuss für das nächste Großereignis des Sportsommers – die Olympischen Sommerspiele 2016. Die Vorfreude bei allen Sportbegeisterten ist riesengroß, denn bei mehr als 340 Stunden live Übertragungen im Fernsehen und über 1.000 Stunden Live-Streams in Web, stellt sich nicht mehr die Frage, ob und was man schauen möchte, sondern vielmehr wie, wo und mit welchem Endgerät. Des einen Freud, des anderen Leid …. denn gerade die Vielfalt an Endgeräten, die rasant steigende Nachfrage von Livestream-Angeboten und die Browservielfalt stellt die Entwickler vor immer größere Herausforderungen. Georg Rechberger gewährt Einblicke, wie man frühzeitig Leistungs- und Funktionsprobleme aufdeckt und eine zuverlässige Perfomrance von Apps erzielen kann.

2016 ist ein absolutes Highlight für alle Sportfans, denn die Großereignisse geben sich quasi die Klinke in die Hand. Kaum sind mit der UEFA EURO 2016 und der Copa America die beiden großen Fussball-Turniere nördlich und südlich des Äquators Geschichte, die neuen Champions des Rasentennis in Wimbledon gefunden und der Sieger der Tour de France kürzlich erst auf der Avenue des Champs-Élysées gekürt, beginnt mit den olympischen Spielen von Rio nun der absolute Höhepunkt des Sportsommers. Am Freitag wird das olympische Feuer im Maracanã Stadion entzündet und in den nächsten 16 Tagen lautet das Motto nicht nur für die Sportler „Dabei sein ist alles“. Mit mehr als 340 Stunden live Übertragungen im Fernsehen und über 1.000 Stunden Video-Live-Streams im Internet stellt sich für die Zuschauer nicht mehr die Frage,  ob und was man schauen möchte, sondern vielmehr wie, wo und mit welchem Endgerät. Alleine die beiden Platzhirsche ARD und ZDF bieten auf ihren Webportalen sportschau.de und sport.zdf.de täglich von 14.00 – 05:00 Uhr morgens sechs verschiedene Live-Streams an und darüber hinaus noch 60 Clips täglich, die als on-Demand Paket das Internet Programm abrunden.

Diese immense Investition der öffentlich-rechtlichen Sender in Live-Streaming- und in Video-on-Demand-Angebote ist auf den allgemeinen Trend zurückzuführen, dass Konsumenten ihr Nutzerverhalten in den letzten Jahren vor allem dank neuer Technologien wie Smartphones und Tablets grundlegend geändert haben. Waren es bei Olympia 2012 in London bereits 25 % der Konsumenten, die die Spiele im Netz statt auf linearem Übertragungsweg verfolgten, so werden es diesmal sicherlich noch weitaus mehr sein. Nicht nur bei Sportevents ist der Trend zu  Mobile Streaming erkennbar:  der The Cisco® Visual Networking Index (VNI) prognostiziert , dass der durch Video verursachte Datenmengenverbrauch innerhalb der nächsten 5 Jahre um 825 % steigen wird. Für die Entwickler solcher Streaming- und Video-on-Demand Anwendungen stellt sich damit nicht nur die Frage, wie diese immens steigenden Datenmengen an den Kunden ausgeliefert werden, sondern auch, wie man für eine immer gleichbleibend hohe Qualität bei der Video-Wiedergabe sorgen kann, und zwar unabhängig davon, ob der Konsument den Live-Stream im Park auf seinem Smartphone, oder auf dem Heimweg in der Straßenbahn auf seinem Tablet oder zuhause vor seinem 50 Zoll 4k Fernseher sitzend verfolgt. Eines ist dabei klar: Qualitätseinbußen, insbesondere solche, wie eine Verzögerung bei der Übertragung, werden seitens der Konsumenten nicht geduldet.

riode1

Denken wir doch jetzt nur einmal an das 100-Meter Finale der Herren in Rio, der wohl prestigeträchtigsten Entscheidung in Brasilien. Usain Bolt und seine Konkurrenten stehen in den Startblöcken und warten auf den Startschuss und just in diesem Moment erscheint auf unserem Bildschirm das Buffering  Symbol, oder eine „Video ist nicht verfügbar“ Notiz oder das Video springt ständig auf Pause – nicht auszudenken, welche Reaktionen ein solcher Vorfall auf Twitter, Facebook oder den anderen sozialen Netzwerken auslösen würde. Neben Spot und Häme in den sozialen Netzwerken müsste der Videostreaming Anbieter im schlimmsten Fall auch noch mit finanziellen Einbußen bei seinen Werbepartnern rechnen, denn wer möchte schon, dass seine Werbung ruckelt und stockend oder überhaupt nicht übertragen wird. Der Nutzer erwartet die gleiche Performance, die er seitens der herkömmlichen Fernsehübertragung gewohnt ist – eine Verzögerung von mehr als einer Minute wird nicht toleriert –  ansonsten wird eine andere Quelle für die Berichterstattung gewählt und der Anbieter läuft Gefahr, seine Abonnements und Werbeinnahmen zu verlieren.
Der Schlüssel für die unterbrechungsfreie Ausführung liegt vor allem in sogenannten Lasttest und in effektiven Leistungsmessungen mit Workloads, die das echte Benutzerverhalten replizieren. Lasttests sind ein wesentlicher Bestandteil des Software-Entwicklungsprozesses. Anwendungen müssen auch bei Nachfragespitzen für Tausende, wenn nicht sogar Hunderttausende verfügbar bleiben und die versprochene Leistung erbringen. Micro Focus bietet mit Silk Performer ein Produkt an, mit dem man bei der derzeit führenden Videostreaming Technologie HLS (HTTP Live Streaming), aussagefähige Last- und Performance Tests durchführen kann. Das Aufzeichnen von Skripten ist hierbei sehr einfach und bei der Testausführung gibt es verschiedene Qualitätsmetriken, die Ihnen zum Beispiel sagen, wie viele Segmente der Streaming Client in verschiedenen Auflösungen heruntergeladen hat. So kann man feststellen, wann mehr Segmente mit niedriger Auflösung geladen wurde, weil die Bandbreite zu gering oder die Infrastruktur nicht der Lage war, gleichzeitig eine hohe Anzahl an hochauflösenden Streams bereitzustellen. Man sieht, wie lange es dauerte das erste Segment herunterzuladen und man kann das Verhältnis zwischen der Dauer der Downloadzeit und der Abspielzeit genau analysieren. Kurzum gesagt, diese Qualitätsmessungen helfen dabei, die Nutzererfahrung in Bezug auf Downloadzeiten, dem Verhältnis von „download-to-play“ Zeiten und dem Live-Streaming  deutlich zu verbessern. Mit den Performancetest-Lösungen von Micro Focus können Sie das echte Benutzerverhalten  geräte-, netzwerk- und standortübergreifend präzise simulieren. Durch die Bereitstellung dieser Lösungen als cloudbasierten Service zur Leistungsmessung kann man  kosteneffektiv sicherstellen, dass geschäftskritische Anwendungen Spitzenlasten bewältigen und wie erwartet von allen Benutzern weltweit auf allen Geräten ausgeführt werden können.

Fazit:

Wenn Kunden schlechte Erfahrungen machen – egal ob mit einer Webseite, einer App oder einem Videostreaming Dienst, werden sie kaum zurückkehren oder Ihre Angebote nutzen. Das Testen auf Performance, Skalierbarkeit und Zuverlässigkeit ist daher von entscheidender Bedeutung. Der Anspruch der Kunden verändert das herkömmliche Verständnis von „Qualität“. Unternehmen können sich inkonsistente Benutzererfahrungen und langsame Reaktionszeiten einfach nicht mehr leisten. Die Tools von Micro Focus decken Funktions- und Leistungsprobleme auf, vermeiden somit Prestige- und Umsatzverluste und helfen dabei, eine zuverlässige Performance von Apps und die Funktionsfähigkeit globaler Websites zu erzielen.

 

Visualizing a Use Case

Have you ever put the finishing touches on your use case in a word document only to find that the visio diagram you had depicting the process flow is now out of date? If you are lucky, you have both some visual model of your functional flows along with the corresponding text to back it up – and let’s not forget about the corresponding test cases!

Have you ever put the finishing touches on your use case in a word document only to find that the visio diagram you had depicting the process flow is now out of date?  If you are lucky, you have both some visual model of your functional flows along with the corresponding text to back it up – and let’s not forget about the corresponding test cases!

In the fast paced world of software development, if you don’t have solid processes in place and have a team that follows it, you might find yourself “out of sync” on a regular basis.  The industry numbers such as “30% of all project work is considered to be rework… and 70% of that rework can be attributed to requirements (incorrect, incomplete, changing, etc.)” start to become a reality as you struggle to keep your teams in sync.

The practice of using “Use Cases” in document form through a standard template was a significant improvement in promoting reuse, consistency and best practices.  However, a written use case in document form is subject to many potential downfalls.

Let’s look at the following template, courtesy of the International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA) St. Louis Chapter:

Skip past the cover page, table of contents, revision history,  approvals and the list of use cases (already sounds tedious right?)  Let’s look at the components of the use case template:

The core structure is based on a feature, the corresponding model (visualization) and the use case (text description).  This should be done for every core feature of your application and depending on the size of your project, this document could become quite large.

The use case itself is comprised of a header which has the use case ID, use case name, who created it and when as well as who last modified it and when.  As you can see, we haven’t even gotten to the meat of the use case and we already have a lot of implied work to maintain this document so you need to make sure you have a good document repository and a good change management process!

Here is a list of the recommended data that should be captured for each use case:

  • Actors
  • Description
  • Trigger
  • Preconditions
  • Postconditions
  • Normal flow
  • Alternative flows
  • Exceptions
  • Includes
  • Frequency of use
  • Special requirements
  • Assumptions
  • Notes and issues

The problem with doing this in textual format is that you lose the context of where you are in the process flow.  Surely there must be a better way?  By combining a visual approach with the text using the visual model as the focus, you will be able to save time by modeling only to the level of detail necessary, validate that you have covered all the possible regular and alternative flows and most importantly, you will capture key items within the context of the use case steps making it much easier to look at the entire process or individual levels of detail as needed.

If you look through the template example, you can quickly see that it is a manual process that you cannot validate without visual inspection, so it is subject to human error.  Also, it is riddled with “rework” since you have to reference previous steps in the different data field boxes to make sense of everything.

Here is a visual depiction of the example provided in the template.  I have actually broken the example into two use cases in order to minimize required testing by simply reusing the common features:

Access and Main Menu

ATM Withdraw Cash

I have added some colorful swim lanes to break the activity steps down into logic groupings. If you think the visualizations look complicated you might be right… they say a picture says a thousand words, so what you have done is taken the thousand words from the use case with all of the variations and you have put them into one visual diagram!  The good news is, it is surprisingly easy to create these diagrams and to translate all of the required data from the use case template directly into this model.  A majority of the complexities of the use case are handled automatically for you.  When it comes time for changes, you no longer have to worry about keeping your model in sync with your text details and you certainly no longer have to worry about keeping references to steps and other parts of the use case document in agreement!

In the next blog, we’ll look at how to model the “Normal flow” described in the use case template.