Trying to Transform

Here’s an interesting statistic. According to a report, only 61 of the Fortune 500 top global companies have remained on that illustrious list since 1955. That’s only 12%. It’s not unreasonable to extrapolate that 88% of the Fortune 500 of 2075 will be different again. That’s over 400 organizations that won’t stand the test of time.

What do such sobering prospects mean for the CEO of most major corporations? Simple – innovation. Innovation and transformation are the relentless treadmill of change and the continuous quest for differentiation. These are what an organization will need for a competitive edge in the future.

But in this digital economy, what does transformation look like?

Time for Change

Key findings from a recent report (the 2016 State of Digital Transformation, by research and consulting firm Altimeter) shared the following trends affecting organizational digital transformation:

  • Customer experience is the top driver for change
  • A majority of respondents see the catalyst for change as evolving customer behaviour and preference. A great number still see that as a significant challenge
  • Nearly half saw a positive result on business as a result of digital transformation
  • Four out of five saw innovation as top of the digital transformation initiatives

Much of this is echoed by a study The Future of Work commissioned by Google.

The three most prevalent outcomes of adopting “digital technologies” were cited as

  • Improving customer experience
  • Improving internal communication
  • Enhancing internal productivity

More specifically, the benefits experienced of adopting digital technology were mentioned as

  • Responding faster to changing needs
  • Optimizing business processes
  • Increasing revenue and profits

Meanwhile, the report states that the digital technologies that are perceived as having the most future impact were a top five of Cloud, Tablets, Smartphones, Social Media and Mobile Apps.

So, leveraging new technology, putting the customer first, and driving innovation seem all to connect together to yield tangible benefits for organizations that are seeking to transform themselves. Great.

But it’s not without its downside. None of this, alas, is easy. Let’s look at some of the challenges cited the same study, and reflect on how they could be mitigated.

More Than Meets The Eye?

Seamlessly changing to support a new business model or customer experience is easy to conceive. We’ve all seen the film Transformers, right? But in practical, here-and-now IT terms, this is not quite so simple. What are the challenges?

The studies cited a few challenges: let’s look at some of them.

Challenge: What exactly is the customer journey?

In the studies, while a refined customer experience was seen as key, 71% saw understanding that behaviour as a major challenge. Unsurprisingly, only half had mapped out the customer journey. More worrying is that a poor digital customer experience means, over 90% of the time, unhappy customers won’t complain – but they will not return. (Source: www.returnonbehaviour.com ).

Our View: The new expectation of the digitally-savvy customer is all important in both B2C and B2B. Failure to assess, determine, plan, build and execute a renewed experience that maps to the new customer requirement is highly risky. That’s why Micro Focus’ Build story incorporates facilities to map, define, implement and test against all aspects of the customer experience, to maximize the success rates of newly-available apps or business services.

Challenge: Who’s doing this?

The studies also showed an ownership disparity. Some of the digital innovation is driven from the CIO’s organization (19%), some from the CMO (34%), and the newly-emerging Chief Digital office (15%) is also getting some of the funding and remit. So who’s in charge and where’s the budget, and is the solution comprehensive? These are all outstanding questions in an increasingly siloed digital workplace.

Our View: While organizationally there may be barriers, the culture of collaboration and inclusiveness can be reinforced by appropriate technology. Technology provides both visibility and insight into objectives, tasks, issues, releases and test cases, not to mention the applications themselves. This garners a stronger tie between all stakeholder groups, across a range of technology platforms, as organizations seek to deliver faster.

Challenge: Are we nimble enough?

Rapid response to new requirements hinges on how fast, and frequently, an organization can deliver new services. Fundamentally, it requires an agile approach – yet 63% saw a challenge in their organization being agile enough. Furthermore, the new DevOps paradigm is not yet the de-facto norm, much as many would want it to be.

Our View: Some of the barriers to success with Agile and DevOps boil down to inadequate technology provision, which is easily resolved – Micro Focus’ breadth of capability up and down the DevOps tool-chain directly tackles many of the most recognized bottlenecks to adoption, from core systems appdev to agile requirements management. Meanwhile, the culture changes of improved teamwork, visibility and collaboration are further supported by open, flexible technology that ensures everyone is fully immersed in and aware of the new model.

Challenge: Who’s paying?

With over 40% reporting strong ROI results, cost effectiveness of any transformation project remains imperative. A lot of CapEx is earmarked and there needs to be an ROI. With significant bottom line savings seen by a variety of clients using its technology, Micro Focus’ approach is always to plan how such innovation will pay for itself in the shortest possible timeframe.

Bridge Old and New

IT infrastructure and how it supports an organization’s business model is no longer the glacial, lumbering machine it once could be. Business demands rapid response to change. Whether its building new customer experiences, establishing and operating new systems and devices, or ensuring clients and the corporation protect key data and access points, Micro Focus continues to invest to support today’s digital agenda.

Of course, innovation or any other form of business transformation will take on different forms depending on the organization, geography, industry and customer base, and looks different to everyone we listen to. What remains true for all is that the business innovation we offer our customers enables them to be more efficient, to deliver new products and services, to operate in new markets, and to deepen their engagement with their customers.

Transforming? You better be. If so, talk to us, or join us at one of our events soon.

ChangeMan ZMF – what’s new?

Hot on the heels of our #iChange2016 DevOps event in Chicago, Al Slovacek looks at the new release of ChangeMan ZMF and anticpates some further integrations that are around the corner. Read on.

The need for speed…

Last year, Serena CEO Greg Hughes coined the term “HRLE” or “Highly Regulated Large Enterprise.” HRLEs depend on the mainframe platform for business critical system. They rely on this platform because of its unrivalled strengths and virtues.

We developed ChangeMan ZMF version 8 with all of these things in mind:

  • The need to move fast without breaking things
  • The need to do more with less

Business agility; the ability to respond to disruption, whether internal or external without losing focus is why leading enterprises depend on ChangeMan ZMF every day.

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ChangeMan ZMF delivers

The new release of ChangeMan ZMF, version 8.1, includes new code in support of over four hundred change requests from you. The prevailing theme of the release is of ease of administration, ease of upgrade and ease of installation. We introduced the HLLX platform, allowing customizations to be kept in an auxiliary area, coded in any LE language, so when you upgrade, you just recouple to the next release. It added the benefit of exposing these customizations to your IDEs and Client Pack components.

We followed up with 8.1.1, with two hundred more change requests, and 8.1.2 with another three hundred change requests. This makes version 8.x a significant step forward in the product focused on the improvements initiated by you.

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That was then….

Back in the day, some HRLE’s had eight to ten ChangeMan ZMF administrators. Today most organizations are down to one or two administrators despite the fact that number of applications, dev teams and IT locations has escalated exponentially. Combine that with navigating through compliance issues, and security concerns and you really do need to move fast without breaking things.

With all of this focus on the administrator, Serena also began to take a ruthless look at ways to improve the developer experience. We cataloged, aggregated and prioritized change requests that pertained to improving how developers experience ChangeMan ZMF. I interviewed customers, pulled discussions from Serena Central and scrubbed our own enhancement and ideas backlog.

Micro Focus and Serena Software – better together

In the middle of this shift of focus for my development teams, Micro Focus came along. Much to our serendipity, developer experience is where Micro Focus have put their recent engineering emphasis. As I’ve mentioned before in VUGs and elsewhere, Serena and Micro Focus have been in the same space for 30 years, yet never competed. This is because our products have never been competitive, but instead have been very complimentary.

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#iChange2016 Chicago

Consider Enterprise Developer for z, which was demonstrated both on the mainstage and in breakouts at iChange. That the two product teams were able to put this integration together in time for iChange, without smoke and mirrors is a testament to how well the products fit in with each other.

Micro Focus sent representatives from their Enterprise and Software Delivery and Test (SD&T) groups to give the attendees at iChange both broad and deep presentations into their solutions, and how easily and effectively they work with ChangeMan ZMF.

Now that the conference is behind us, the product teams are collaborating on the next wave of integrations. ZMF and Enterprise Test Server, Enterprise Sync, Enterprise Analyzer to name a few.

Look for some exciting developments in the coming months or contact us to find out more.

A classic never goes out of style

Die digitale Transformation von Geschäftsprozessen sowie die Modernisierung und Optimierung der IT- Infrastruktur lassen die Rufe nach der Ablösung des Mainframe lauter werden. Zudem haftet dem “Dino” der IT ein zunehmend negatives Image an: zu teuer, zu unmodern, zu unflexibel. Doch Fakt ist auch, dass Cobol Anwendungen immer noch großen Einfluss auf unser tägliches Leben haben. Die Flugbuchung, die Sitzplatzreservierung im ICE, das Bezahlen bei Zalando, Amazon & Co. -am Ende ist es fast immer COBOL-Code, der involviert ist. Es stellt sich also die zentrale Frage: Wie kann man bestehende Geschäftsmodelle samt vorhandenen Geschäftsregeln und Applikationen in neue Systeme einbringen, die flexibel, dynamisch und web-orientiert sind? Martin Reusch liefert Antworten…

Vor fast 125 Jahren wurde das Unternehmen Coca Cola in Atlanta gegründet. Trotz des auch für ein Unternehmen stattlichen Alters, ist die Coca Cola alles andere als angestaubt und unmodern. Für Coca Cola, dem Getränk in der unverwechselbaren, bauchigen Kontur-Glasflasche oder der rot-weißen Dose  gelten anscheinend nicht die Regeln des Alterns. Sprachforschern zufolge ist Coca-Cola heute das zweitbekannteste Wort der Welt nach „Okay“, es ist die wertvollste Marke der Welt, denn  Coca Cola ist das auch heute noch das Erfrischungs-Getränk Nummer 1 und das trotz  immer neuer Brausegetränke. Anderes Beispiel – Mythos Porsche 911, seit über 50 Jahren das Herzstück der Marke Porsche. Der erste 911 wurde 1963 auf der IAA in Frankfurt vorgestellt und ist seitdem einfach geblieben, auch wenn das heutige Modell längst nicht mehr mit dem ursprünglichen Original zu vergleichen ist. Denn Porsche hat es stets verstanden, dieses einzigartige Modell durch intelligente Ideen und Technologien, welche Performance, Alltagstauglichkeit, Sicherheit und Nachhaltigkeit verknüpften, immer weiter zu modifizieren.

Auch in der IT gibt es vergleichbare Klassiker. Großrechner, besser als Mainframe bekannt, oder COBOL die Programmiersprache für viele Businessanwendungen, existieren ebenfalls seit Anfang der 60er Jahre. Doch die während ein Klassiker wie der Porsche 911 heute ein Mythos ist und mit positiven Charakteristika wie Wertbeständigkeit, Stilistik und Dynamik verbunden wird, haftet dem Mainframe und seiner beherrschenden Programmiersprache COBOL in der Öffentlichkeit ein zunehmend negatives Image an: die Systeme und Applikationen gelten als veraltet, unmodern, unsicher und deswegen als zu risikoreich, sie aufrechtzuerhalten. Diese eher abwertende Sichtweise wird zudem begünstigt durch neue Technologieansätze wie Big Data, Cloud Computing, Mobile- und Sozial Business Technologien. Trotz des vermeintlichen negativen Stigma verwenden aber nach einer aktuellen Schätzung von IBM immer noch rund 55 Prozent aller weltweiten Enterprise-Anwendungen bei Banken und Versicherungen in der einen oder anderen Weise einen COBOL-Code. Geld am Automaten abheben oder überweisen, bei Amazon, Zalando oder eBay einkaufen – am Ende ist es fast immer COBOL-Code, der die Kontostände ausgleicht. Die Flugbuchung, die Sitzplatzreservierung im ICE etc. – ohne dass wir es merken, haben der Mainframe und seine COBOL-Anwendungen immer noch großen Einfluss auf unser tägliches Leben.

Wachsende Probleme durch Digitale Transformation

Nicht zu leugnen ist aber auch, dass die IT-Industrie gegenwärtig einen rasanten Wandel durchläuft, bei dem gerade die digitale Transformation von Geschäftsprozessen sowie die Modernisierung und Optimierung der IT- Infrastruktur bezogen auf neue Technologietrends wie Mobility, Social Business und BYOD eine zentrale Rolle spielen. Auch wenn die Mainframe-Umgebung als operationskritische Plattform hierbei nach wie eine Rolle spielen kann, stellt die Einführung agiler Entwicklungsmodelle und steigende Anforderungen an die Flexibilität der Hardware bestehende Konzepte vor Probleme, denn an der der stetigen Wartung, Aktualisierung und Weiterentwicklung von systemrelevanten Mainframe-Applikationen führt auch sowohl aus technischer als auch fachlicher Sicht kein Weg vorbei.

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Viele der Themen sowie der damit verbundenen Herausforderungen sind nicht neu, schließlich beschäftigen sich die IT-Branche  seit der Entwicklung des Internets vor 20 Jahren bereits mit dem Prozess der Digitalisierung und den Folgen, die sie hervorruft. Neu ist hingegen ist die Geschwindigkeit, mit der die teils disruptiven neuen Technologien wie Mobility und Connectivity, Cloud Computing, Sozial Media und Big Data Analytics, neue Geschäftsmodelle, Prozesse und Wertschöpfungsketten entstehen lassen. Bedenkt man dann noch, dass ehemalige Start-ups wie Amazon, Google, Spotify, ebay oder booking.com, die ohne die Zwänge historisch gewachsener Unternehmenskulturen und Strukturen agil neue Geschäftsmodelle in einem etablierten Markt platzieren und als branchenfremde Unternehmen in die Märkte der etablierten Platzhirsche eindringen, wird schnell klar, dass die Letztgenannten und ihre IT-Abteilungen unter starkem Zwang stehen, ihr unternehmerisches Handeln zu überdenken, und ihre bestehenden Geschäftsmodelle den sich verändernden Erwartungen, Bedürfnissen und Verhaltensschema der Kunden anzupassen und weiterzuentwickeln.

Zwangsläufig stellt sich dabei dann immer wieder die zentrale Frage: Wie kann man bestehende Geschäftsmodelle samt vorhandenen Geschäftsregeln und Applikationen in neue Systeme einbringen, die flexibel, dynamisch und web-orientiert sind?

Die Unternehmensführung erwartet von der IT, dass die Business Applikationen nicht mehr isoliert voneinander ablaufen, sondern das Produktion, betriebliche Abläufe und Kunden in einer einzelnen, integrierten Lösung in die Wertschöpfungskette eingebunden werden. Die Fertigung möchte spezifisch auf den Kundenwunsch abgestimmt produzieren, das Marketing will personalisierte Produktempfehlungen abgeben und viele Unternehmen bereiten sich zudem auf die Herausforderungen durch die Industrie 4.0 vor, die beispielsweise vorausschauende Wartung ermöglicht. Dazu müssen allerdings die unterschiedlichen Backend-Systeme wie die Kundendatenbank und das Enterprise Resource Planning, die Analyse-Tools im Marketing und das SAP miteinander verknüpft sein.

In vielen Unternehmen hingegen ist die IT ist im Laufe der Jahre zu einer technologisch heterogenen Applikationslandschaft herangewachsen, die zwar immer wieder aktualisiert, ergänzt und erweitert – mit den unterschiedlichsten Technologien – von COBOL, Microsoft VB, Java oder C# bis hin zu Standardpaketen wie SAP. Doch eben diese verschiedenen Technologien verhindern oftmals den Aufbau eines integrierten Systems. Es existiert ein Mosaik an Applikationen mit einer Vielzahl von Anwendungen, Datenbanken und komplexen Schnittstellen, die Prozessstörungen verursachen können.

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Revolution vs. Evolution – welcher Ansatz ist der Richtige?

Wie modernisiert man nun also seine Applikationslandschaft – verfolgt man den revolutionären Ansatz mit einer kompletten Neuentwicklung oder der Einführung von Standardapplikationen, oder ist eine evolutionäre Anwendungsmodernisierung der eigenen Individualsoftware der bessere Weg?

Die radikale Lösung mit einer kompletten Neuentwicklung einer über Jahrzehnte gewachsenen Kernapplikation, die einen Millionenwert an fachlicher Businesslogik darstellt? Dazu fehlen selbst Banken die Zeit und die Ressourcen, außerdem sind mit einem solchen Vorgehen viele Risiken und immense Kosten verbunden. Der Umstieg z.B. auf ein neues Core-Banking System im Bankenbereich kann ohne weiteres Kosten im zweistelligen Millionenbereich Bereich nach sich ziehen, angesichts immer knapper werdender IT-Budgets und wachsendem Zeitdruck keine wirkliche Alternative.

Eine wesentlich kostengünstigerer und auch sicherer Weg ist die Anwendungsmodernisierung unternehmenskritischer Applikationen, bei dem dank einer evolutionären Vorgehensweise nicht nur der Wert der Anwendung erhalten wird, sondern diese kontinuierlich mit der geforderten Flexibilität und Agilität weiter entwickelt und optimiert wird.

Aufgrund unterschiedlicher Modernisierungsansätze, sollten zunächst die Ziele, die man erreichen will, genau formuliert werden:

  • Kosteneinsparungen

Durch einen Umstieg auf kostengünstigere Plattformen und den Einsatz von Open-Source-Technologien lassen sich Betriebskosten signifikant reduzieren – in der Spitze um über 70 Prozent.

  • Produktivität & Time-to-Market

Mithilfe moderner Entwicklungsumgebungen und entsprechender Tools (bspw. Versions- Test- und Releasemanagement) kann die Produktivität gesteigert und gleichzeitig das Risiko minimiert werden. Das fördert eine schnellere Umsetzung neuer Ideen und stellt die Akzeptanz der Nutzer sicher.

  • Wiederverwendbarkeit & Zukunftsfähigkeit vorhandener COBOL Anwendungen

Operative Betriebsrisiken minimieren sich z.B. in Bezug auf Know-how, Technologie, Sicherheitslücken und Kosten. Aktuelle technologische Standards schaffen darüber hinaus die Basis für eine schnelle Reaktion auf neue Anforderungen (z.B. Regulatorik).

Entscheidet man sich für die Modernisierung der Infrastruktur, ist im Falle von auf dem Host betriebenen Anwendungen oft ein Rehosting der Applikationen sinnvoll. Beim Rehosting verlagert man die Anwendung(en) auf eine andere kostengünstere Plattform in der dezentralen Welt (UNIX, Linux oder Windows), ohne Änderung der Funktionalität. Der Kern der Enterprise-Applikationen bleibt grundsätzlich erhalten, also die Business-Logik, wie sie beispielsweise in COBOL- oder PL/1-Code implementiert ist.

Möchte man einen ganzheitlichen Ansatz realisieren, um eine bessere Zusammenarbeit der einzelnen Bereiche (Entwicklung, Qualitätssicherung, Operating) zu erreichen und so die Qualität, die Effizienz und den Software-Entwicklungszyklus für den Mainframe verbessern, so ist die Realisierung einer DevOps Strategie für MainframeUmgebungen der richtige Ansatz. Eine solche Strategie hilft, die Fehlerquote bei neuen Produktversionen zu verringern, die Bereitstellung neuer Anwendungen zu beschleunigen und den Zeitraum für das Beheben kurzzeitiger Störungen zu minimieren.

Ist die Wiederverwendung der bestehenden Geschäftsregeln und Anwendungen in neuen Systemumgebungen der dezentralen Welt, die flexibel, dynamisch und web-orientiert sind, das Ziel, muss die COBOL-Softwareentwicklung vom Komfort aktueller integrierter Entwicklungsoberflächen (IDEs) wie Visual Studio oder Eclipse profitieren. Der größte Vorteil liegt aber wahrscheinlich in der Möglichkeit, innerhalb einer einzigen IDE COBOL-Legacy-Code mit neueren, etwa in Java geschriebenen Projekten zusammenzubringen. So werden hybride Lösungen möglich, bei denen beispielsweise das COBOL-Backend mit einem Java-, RCP- oder Web-Frontend kombiniert werden.

In den kommenden Wochen werden wir hierzu verschiedene Szenarien der Anwendungsmodernisierung und ihre Vorteile näher erläutern.

Geo-fencing: securing authentication?

Micro Focus is leading the industry in geo-fencing and Advanced Authentication with it’s NetIQ portfolio. Simon Puleo looks at this fascinating new area and suggests some potential and very practical uses for this technology in his latest blog

Are you are one of the 500 million users who recently had their account details stolen from Yahoo?

Chances are that criminals will use them for credential stuffing – using automation to try different combinations of passwords and usernames at multiple sites to login to your accounts.

So you’re probably thinking the same as me – that a single username and password is no longer sufficient protection from malicious log-in, especially when recycled on multiple sites.

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Is your identity on the line?

Indeed, 75% of respondents to a September 2016 Ponemon study agreed that “single-factor authentication no longer effectively protects unauthorized access to information.”

Biometric authentication is one solution and is already a feature of newer iPhones. However, skimmers and shimmers are already seeking to undermine even this.

Perhaps geo-fencing, the emerging alternative, can address the balancing act between user experience and security? It provides effective authentication and can be easily deployed for users with a GPS device. Let’s take a closer look at what this technology is, and how it can be used.

What is geo-fencing?

Geo-fencing enables software administrators to define geographical boundaries. They draw a shape around the perimeter of a building or area where they want to enforce a virtual barrier.  It is really that easy. The administrator decides who can access what within that barrier, based on GPS coordinates. In the example below, an admin has set a policy that only state employees with a GPS can access systems within the Capitol Building.

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Let’s dive deeper, and differentiate between geo-location and geo-fencing. Because geo-location uses your IP it can be easily spoofed or fooled, and is not geographically accurate. However geo-fencing is based on GPS coordinates from satellites tracking latitude and longitude.

While GPS can be spoofed it requires loads of expensive scientific equipment and certain features to validate the signal. Using geo-coordinates enables new sets of policies and controls to ensure security and enforce seamless verification, keeping it easy for the user to log-in and hard for the criminal to break in. Consider the below example:

Security Policy: Users must logout when leaving their work area.

Real-world scenario: Let’s go and get a coffee right now. Ever drop what you are doing, leaving your PC unlocked and vulnerable to insider attacks? Sure you have.

Control: Based on a geo-fence as small as five feet, users could be logged out when they leave their cube with a geo device, then logged back in when they return. It’s a perfect combination of convenience, caffeine and security.

Patient safety, IT security 

This scenario may sound incredible, but Troy Drewry, a Micro Focus Product Manager, explains that it is not that far-fetched. Troy shared his excitement for the topic – and a number of geo based authentication projects he is involved in – with me. One effort is enabling doctors and medical staff to login and logout of workstations simply by their physical location. This could help save valuable time in time-critical ER situations while still enforcing HIPAA policies.

Another project is working with an innovative bank that is researching using geo-fencing around ATMs to provide another factor of validation.  In this scenario, geo-fencing could have the advantage of PIN-less transactions, circumventing skimmers.

As he explained to me, “What is interesting to me is that with geo-fencing and user location as a factor of authentication, it means that security and convenience are less at odds.” I couldn’t agree more. Pressing the button on my hard token to login to my bank accounts seems almost anachronistic; geo-fencing is charting a new route for authentication.

Micro Focus is leading the industry in geo-fencing and Advanced Authentication. To learn more, speak with one of our specialists or click here.

 

The choice is yours – #DevDay drivers

The Micro Focus DevDay roadshow continues to attract large crowds. David Lawrence attended our latest shows to learn why it remains the must-see event for the COBOL community

#DevDay draws in the crowds

With hundreds of attendees over the past 12 months, Micro Focus DevDays continue to pack them in. Last  week’s events in New York and Toronto were no exception. This blog uncovers why so many of the global COBOL community attend our event.

We spoke with application developers from institutions, large and small, looking for solutions to build on, maintain, extend and adapt their inventory of business-critical COBOL applications to meet new business needs or opportunities. These customers view COBOL as fundamental to their respective business strategy and operations, not just for today, but into the future. These clients have, by and large, seen how extending and adapting their current proven and reliable COBOL solutions delivers more value faster, and with less risk than other strategies.

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Skilling up

One attendee we spoke with came to DevDays because of increasing new business demands on his application portfolio. This person has been looking to increase his COBOL staff to meet them. He had advertised for COBOL programmers, but it seemed there were none to be found in his market. So, he is changing his approach, and has now decided to bring in a skilled C# or Java developer and train them in-house on COBOL.

We suggested the expediency of putting these new staff members in front of a modern IDE for COBOL, one which looks and feels like the modern IDEs available for Java or C#, and is supported for both Eclipse and Visual Studio environments. Micro Focus Visual COBOL and Enterprise Developer fit the bill nicely. These modern IDE’s offer advanced automation features, such as configurable, panel-based layouts, wizards, and a context sensitive editor, and, a seamless interaction with modern managed code environments (Java and/or .NET). They will be entirely familiar to those from a Java or .NET background.

Coincidentally, that topic was covered in the afternoon session which showed Micro Focus’ solutions for mainframe developers:  Enterprise Analyzer and Enterprise Developer. We heard from C# programmers who found that by using Enterprise Developer as their IDE they were productive in COBOL in less than a week.

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Go OO – ­and fast

In response to a question about working with object-oriented solutions, the audience was treated to a live demo by Micro Focus’s own Mike Bleistein. Using the standard capabilities of our development tools, Mike built an interface to a traditional relational database, using an older COBOL application. Mike used our object oriented COBOL classes to create a simple mortgage rate query application with a modern user interface, which made it more accessible and more easily used than the ‘green screen’, text-based implementation it would replace.  Such a transformation takes an hour for a simple application, a fraction of the time it would take to take to do this by hand.

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Banking on the latest capabilities

Another attendee, a major international banking client, uses our mainframe development technology. They wanted to identify a path towards implementing the latest release of our Enterprise Developer product. This release offers a more efficient Eclipse-based environment which will integrate into their existing Eclipse environment. In addition, this customer is also seeking ways to establish a more available and easily managed mainframe test environment, which is another of the Micro Focus enterprise technology offerings.

Opening up Open Systems

A developer whose organization builds and operates core COBOL systems under UNIX, said their reason for attending DevDay was driven by market demand. Their challenge is simple – how can their core business service be made available across new internet and mobile interfaces? Establishing a modern, digital interface for their clients is vital. Our experts showed the Micro Focus Visual COBOL technology, which does just that, providing insight in to how that challenge can be met, fast, at low risk.

Technology choices

We spoke with an independent software developer. Devising a new application, the developer has been exploring a range of modern development technologies for building the right ‘front end’. But when we asked them about the core business processing, they confessed “That’s a no brainer – it has to be COBOL – it’s the best tool for the job”. DevDay showed them live examples of how COBOL and newer technologies can integrate and co-exist in today’s platforms.

Micro Focus – the COBOL guys

So, what are we saying here? Simple – a great many organizations, all facing unique challenges, keep turning and returning to COBOL, and Micro Focus technology, to resolve their issues.

Micro Focus continues to invest over $60 million annually to support just about any COBOL environment our customers have run in the past and present, or will run in the future. It was great to meet many of them this week in New York and Toronto. Here’s to many more #DevDay events.

David Lawrence

Global Sales Enablement Specialist

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We’re heading to Oracle Open World

This Ed Airey blog explains how the modern enterprise can harness technology and technique to outpace and counter the changing face of completion and achieve sustainable business agility. Ed will be at Oracle Open World discussing this further at his session: Destination Java: Take enterprise apps to JVM and the Cloud so if you’re attending don’t hesitate to find him and chat more…

Into the Future: new tools for the agile enterprise

What is the agile enterprise? Is it an organization ready to respond to new demands or business opportunity, rapid changes in the market or changes in consumer demand?  To survive-it must achieve all these goals and more. This is the new norm for 21st century business – ever increasing flexibility. But how does business obtain and keep that nimble responsiveness to change? Is there a secret ingredient to the recipe of organizations that have done so already?  To be agile is to be adaptable—to flex and shift to meet the challenges of one’s environment. Just as the chameleon adapts to his surroundings shielding itself from predators a business organization must adjust its strategy and approach to counter its competition.  For most enterprise shops this is not an easy feat. Mired in technical debt, most IT leaders struggle to manage their IT backlog alongside new business initiatives.  Addressing both requires new thinking, new tech and a new approach to enterprise modernization.

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The Case for Modernization

For organizations struggling to cope with increasing IT debt and an older enterprise application portfolio, consider the innovative path taken by a very well-known European auto-manufacturer.  For years, this organization maintained a sterling reputation for quality, performance and service.  Its aging IT infrastructure, however, now plagued with stability problems threatened its ability to both service its customers and maintain its industry prestige.

The manufacturer considered a complete replacement of its core application infrastructure but quickly realized this would be both costly and risky to business operations.  In a fiercely competitive auto market, competitive advantage was paramount and this organization couldn’t afford to lose a step to the competition by disregarding its precious intellectual property.

Modern tools and new technology was employed to modernize its core enterprise applications. Using the power of Eclipse, new and existing IT teams could quickly integrate existing enterprise applications with Java, web services and other solutions. Enterprise application deployment to the Java virtual machine (JVM) enabled future flexibility and scale to meet new business requirements and opportunity. Modern tools and a new mindset delivered fast results—all without rewriting valued application code.

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Oracle Open World #OOW16

The key to this strategy—unlock the value of IT investments. This year in San Francisco at the Oracle Open World event come and see the future of enterprise application modernization for yourself.  Explore how to easily take existing enterprise systems to new platforms including Java, the JVM, and Linux.  We’ll examine how this European car manufacturer and other businesses took their enterprise applications to modern environments using new tools, new thinking and Micro Focus’ game changing solution Visual COBOL

If you’re attending please don’t hestitate to come and visit us at our booth at the Networking Station @ Oracle Linux, Virtualization and OpenStack Showcase and please attend my sessionTake Enterprise Apps to Java Virtual Machine and the Cloud’ on Tuesday, Sep 20 at 16:00 -16:20 in the Moscone South Exhibition Hall to discuss modernization options further….

Ed

Innovate Faster with Lower Risk at Micro Focus DevOps Interchange 2016

Mark Levy blogs about the upcoming Micro Focus DevOps Interchange 2016 with over 60 technical sessions focused on how to design, build, test, and deploy applications faster, with less risk in a repeatable, reliable and secure way. DevOps Interchange will be a great opportunity to network, get solutions for your problems and share your ideas and solutions.

Marketing and Innovation

Peter Drucker, the father of modern management said, “Because the purpose of business is to create a customer, the business enterprise has two – and only two – basic functions: marketing and innovation. Marketing and innovation produce results; all the rest are costs.” Marketing is required to understand the needs of the customer and innovation is required to build the product or services that fit those customer needs.

Innovation provides competitive differentiation in the markets where you have to be consistently better and smarter at creating customers than your competitors.  Businesses have been using innovation as a competitive weapon for centuries to create value and differentiation, but only recently have businesses been using software to enable and accelerate business innovation.

Building and delivering software has always been a difficult race against time. I was a software developer for well over 10 years and I was always racing to a date. But over the last several years, that race has entered an even more challenging phase. Several market forces are at work, putting the pressure on the business to deliver business value faster, with better quality, and at a lower cost to the customer.

With the explosion of mobile, there is a newly empowered customer who is forcing the business to deliver quickly to prove out business ideas and innovations. If the business is not responsive enough, low switching costs enables the customer to easily migrate to another competitor.  Additionally, digital competition is everywhere. Firms that use software and the cloud to disrupt established markets can move faster than more traditional businesses because software-based services can evolve faster and offer the opportunity to out-innovate market incumbents.  Epic battles are already being waged across many industries between incumbents and software powered companies.

Finally, the impact of software has dramatically increased across all kinds of business. Today, business innovation is often driven by information technology, which itself demands changes to software.  Software development and delivery has to change or the business will be at risk.

business-operations

Innovate Faster with Lower Risk

Today, every enterprise IT organization is under pressure to simultaneously respond more quickly to enable business innovation, and at the same time provide a stable, secure, compliant and predictable IT environment.  IT must maintain and update the “Enterprise Software Engine” that is running the enterprise, i.e., keeping the lights on, while also providing capacity to support business innovation.  These are not mutually exclusive but actually form an integrated value chain that leverages the traditional systems of record with the customer facing systems of innovation.  These pressures have given rise to Enterprise DevOps as all enterprises must enable the business to innovate faster with lower risk.

Enterprise DevOps is all about building and delivering better quality software, faster and more reliably. IT organizations that implement Enterprise DevOps practices achieve higher IT and organizational performance, spanning both development and operations.  Technical practices such as Continuous Delivery lead to lower levels of deployment pain while speeding up application delivery and improving quality, security, and business outcomes.  The DevOps culture promotes a generative, high trust, performance-oriented culture which enables good information flow, cross-functional collaboration and job satisfaction.  This all leads to higher levels of productivity enabling business innovation with lower risk.

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Micro Focus DevOps Interchange 2016

This very important topic will be the main focus of Micro Focus’s first annual global user conference, DevOps Interchange 2016 , September 18-21, 2016 in Chicago, Ill.  Micro Focus’s own John Delk,  Product Group GM at Micro Focus, will kick off the conference with his “Vision 2020” look at how software development and delivery technology will change and how we must adapt and embrace it. We have also invited Gary Gruver, author of “Leading the transformation – Applying DevOps and Agile principles at scale”, to give a keynote talk about DevOps, where to begin, and how to scale DevOps practices over time in large enterprises.  With over 60 technical sessions, focused on how to design, build, test, and deploy applications faster, with less risk in a repeatable, reliable and secure way, this conference will be a great opportunity to network, get solutions for your problems and share your ideas and solutions.  I hope to see you there!

DevOpsExchange

 

#DevDay Report – so what does COBOL look like now?

David Lawrence reports back from the latest Micro Focus #DevDays and what COBOL looks like these days. With Partners like Astadia it seems like anything’s possible…..including Mobile Augmented Reality! Read on.

To most people, COBOL applications probably look like this:

dlpic1

and are thought to do nothing more than this:

DLpic2

These applications are likely to be COBOL-based. After all, COBOL is the application language for business. With over 240 billion (with a b) lines of code still in production, the fact is that COBOL is used in thousands, if not millions, of applications that have nothing to do with finance.

It’s called the COmmon Business Oriented Language for a reason. The reason is that it was designed to automate the processing of any business transaction, regardless of the nature of the business.

Did you realize that COBOL is also widely used by municipalities, utilities and transportation companies?

At our Nashville Micro Focus DevDay event on June 21, the audience was treated to a very interesting presentation by a major American railroad organization, where they showed us how their COBOL application inventory runs their daily operations (scheduling, rolling stock management, crews, train make up and dispatch).

Earlier in the month we heard from a client who was using COBOL applications to capture, monitor and analyze game and player statistics in the world of major league baseball.

Many attendees of our COBOL and mainframe app dev community events, DevDay, are managing crucial COBOL applications as the lifeblood of their business. From managing retailers’ stock control systems, to haulage and logistics organziations’ shipments and deliveries, from healthcare, pharma and food production organizations, to major financial service, insurance and wealth management systems.

Those applications contain decades of valuable business rules and logic. Imagine if there was a way to make use of all that knowledge, by say using it to more accurately render a street diagram.

You say “Yes, that’s nice, but I already have Google Maps.” All very well and good. But what if you are a utility company trying to locate a troublesome underground asset, such as a leaking valve or short circuited, overheating power cable?

Astadia has come up with a very interesting solution that combines wealth of intelligence built into the COBOL applications that are invariably the heart and brains of most large utilities or municipalities with modern GPS-enabled devices

DevDay Boston

I had a chance to see this first hand at DevDay Boston. DevDay is a traveling exposition that features the newest offerings from Micro Focus combined with real life experiences from customers.

Astadia, a Micro Focus partner and application modernization consultancy, visted our Boston DevDays and showed us their mobile augmented reality application which enhances street view data with additional information needed by field crews.

Steve Steuart, one of Astadia’s Senior Directors, visted our Boston DevDays, and introduced the attendees to ARGIS, their augmented reality solution that helps field engineers locate underground or otherwise hidden physical infrastructure asset such as power and water distribution equipment.

I watched as Steve explained and demonstrated ARGIS overlaying, in real time, the locations of manhole covers and drains in the vicinity of the Marriott onto a Google Maps image of the area surrounding the Marriott Hotel . .. Steve explained that ARGIS was using the GPS in the tablet and mining the intelligence from the COBOL application used by the Boston Department of Public works department to track the locations in real time, superimposed over the street view, the precise location of the network of pipes and valves supplying water to the area

Here’s a picture .. certainly worth a thousand words, wouldn’t you say?

Below you see how the Astadia‘s ARGIS Augmented Reality system sources the data of the local utility company’s COBOL application inventory to give clear visual indications of the locations of key field infrastructure components (e.g. pipes, valves, transformers) over a view of what the field engineer is actually seeing. Nice to have when you’re trying to work out where to dig, isn’t it?

Poc1

Very imaginative indeed, but at the heart of this new innovation, the important data and logic comes from, guess where? . . yes, it comes from a COBOL application. Micro Focus solutions help mine and reuse those crucial business rules locked up in our customers’ portfolio of proven, reliable COBOL applications. This will prolong their longevity and flow of value to the business. Why take all that risk and spend millions to replicate intelligence that already exists, but which has been hard to utilize effectively?

Afterwards, I spoke with Steve – Astadia’s senior director who remarked: “As long as Micro Focus continues to invest in COBOL, COBOL will continue to be relevant.”

Speaking afterwards with Micro Focus’ Director of COBOL Solutions, Ed Airey, he commented

“We are always thrilled to see how our partners and customers are taking advantage of the innovation possible in our COBOL technology to build applications that meet their needs in the digital age. Astadia’s ARGIS product is great. I’m not surprised to see how far they’ve been able to extend their application set in this way – Visual COBOL was designed with exactly that sort of innovation in mind. The only constant in IT is change, and with Micro Focus COBOL in their corner our customers are able to modernize much faster and more effectively than they realize”.

See real world applications and how they can be modernized at a Micro Focus DevDay near you. For more information on our COBOL Delivery and Mainframe Solutions, go here.

David Lawrence

Global Sales Enablement Specialist

DLblog

Alles Wolke 7 oder doch eher Wolkenbruch? – Cloud Computing ist Realität, hybride Lösungen sind die Konsequenz

Cloud Computing rückt 2016 in Fokus vieler deutscher mittelständischer Unternehmen. Verständlich denn, getragen von der digitalen Transformation sorgt Cloud Computing für die Optimierung der Kapitalbasis, indem sich ausgewählte IT-Kosten von einem Investitions- hin zu einem Betriebskostenmodell verlagern. Doch wie sieht es mit Sicherheitsrisiken und der Durchsetzung von Compliance dabei aus? Sind die Daten in der Cloud wirklich sicher und wo liegen sie und wer kontrolliert sie? Christoph Stoica erläutert im neuen Blogbeitrag, welche Aspekte aus der IT-Security Sicht beachtet werden sollten.

Wenn man einen Blick in den aktuellen Cloud Monitor 2015 der Bitkom wirft, dann ist es keine Frage mehr : Cloud Computing ist jetzt auch bei den deutschen mittelständischen Unternehmen angekommen und die Anpassung geht mit großen Schritten voran.  Einer der maßgeblichen Treiber für die gestiegene Akzeptanz der Cloud in Deutschland ist die digitale Transformation.  Auf Basis von neuen Technologien und Applikationen werden Produkte, Services und Prozesse umgestaltet, so dass sich Unternehmen nach und nach zu einer vollständig vernetzten digitalen Organisation wandeln. Wer jetzt denkt, dies alles sei Zukunftsmusik und gehöre nicht auf die Agenda der  TOP-Prioritäten, dem sei gesagt : weit gefehlt!

Schon jetzt bewegen wir uns mit einer Höchstgeschwindigkeit in eine voll vernetzte Welt.  Immer mehr Menschen verfügen über mobile Endgeräte, hinterlassen digitale Spuren in sozialen Netzwerken, tragen Wearables  die  ihre persönlichen Daten – ob freiwillig oder nicht – senden und für Unternehmen verfügbar machen. Maschinen und Gegenstände sind über  Sensoren und SIM-Karten jederzeit digital ansprechbar, was zu veränderten und erweiterten Wertschöpfungsketten führt.  Die Vielzahl der so gesammelten Daten stellt für Unternehmen  einen  wichtigen Rohstoff dar, der, durch geschickte Analytics Tools richtig genutzt, den entscheidenden Wettbewerbsvorteil verschaffen kann. Es stellt sich also nicht die Frage, ob die digitale Transformation erfolgt, sondern vielmehr wie schnell die Unternehmensführung die entsprechende Weichenstellung in der IT-Infrastruktur vornimmt.

Die digitale Transformation erfordert skalierbare Infrastrukturen – sowohl technisch als auch hinsichtlich der internationalen Reichweite. Cloud Dienste, ob public oder private, mit ihren Merkmalen wie Agilität,  Anpassungsfähigkeit, Flexibilität und  Reaktivität sind hierfür bestens dafür geschaffen. Doch wie sieht es mit den Sicherheitsrisiken und der Durchsetzung von Compliance dabei aus? Sind die Daten in der Cloud sicher? Wo genau liegen meine Daten und wer kontrolliert sie? Auch wenn nach dem kürzlich gefallenen Safe Harbor Urteil „Big Player“ wie Amazon Web Services, Profitbricks, Salesforce und Microsoft nun ihre Rechenzentren in Deutschland oder zumindest an einen EU Standort verlagern, löst das immer noch nicht alle Sicherheitsfragen. Reicht ein Zugriffsmanagement basierend auf einer einfachen Authentifizierung mittels Benutzername und Passwort angesichts der größeren Angriffsfläche noch aus?

dataprotection

Benutzernamen und Passwörter lassen sich heutzutage leicht überlisten, das neue Zaubermittel heißt  Multi-Faktor Authentifizierung. Eine  erweiterte Authentifizierungsmethode unter Nutzung zusätzlicher Faktoren ermöglicht  eine schnelle und präzise Identifikation. Unterschiedliche Benutzer oder Situationen erfordern unterschiedliche Authentifizierungen, die verwendete Methode muss zur  Rolle als auch zum Kontext des Benutzers passen und natürlich der Risikoeinstufung der angeforderten Informationen gerecht werden. Nicht jede Interaktion birgt dasselbe Risiko für ein Unternehmen. Einige Interaktionen stellen eine größere Gefahr dar. Bei einer risikobehafteten Interaktion wird eine strengere Authentifizierung benötigt, die beispielsweise durch eine zusätzliche Information (die nur dem Benutzer bekannt ist), die zusätzliche Verifizierung der Identität über getrennte Kanäle – man spricht von Out of Band – oder andere Elemente gewährleistet wird.

Jedoch kann die Verwendung und Verwaltung solcher mehrstufiger Authentifizierungsverfahren kostspielig und unübersichtlich werden. Micro Focus bietet mit Advanced Authentication eine Lösung zur zentralen Verwaltung aller Authentifizierungsverfahren – ob für Ihre Mitarbeiter, Lieferanten oder Geräte.

Christoph

 

 

 

 

Christoph Stoica

Regional General Manager DACH

Micro Focus

Change – the only constant in IT?

Change is a constant in our lives. Organizations have altered beyond recognition in just a decade, and IT is struggling to keep pace. Managing change efficiently is therefore critical. To help us, Derek Britton set off to find that rarest of IT treasures: technology that just keeps on going.

Introduction

A recent survey of IT leaders reported their backlog had increased by a third in 18 months. IT’s mountain to climb had just received fresh snowfall. While a lot is reported about digital and disruptive technologies causing the change, even the mundane needs attention. The basics, such as desktop platforms, server rooms, are staples of IT on a frequent release cadence from the vendors.

Platform Change: It’s the Law

Moore’s Law suggests an ongoing, dramatic improvement processor performance, and the manufacturers continue to innovate to provide more and more power to the platform and operating system vendors, as well as the technology vendor and end user communities at large. And the law of competition suggests that as one vendor releases a new variant of operating system, chock full of new capability and uniqueness, their rivals will aim to leapfrog them in their subsequent launch. Such is the tidal flow of the distributed computing world. Indeed, major vendors are even competing with themselves (for example Oracle promotes both Solaris and Linux, IBM AIX and Linux, even Windows will ship with Unbuntu pre-loaded now).

platform

Keep the Frequency Clear

Looking at some of the recent history of operating system releases, support lifespans and retirements, across Windows, UNIX and Linux operating systems, a drumbeat of updates exists. While some specifics may vary, it becomes quite clear quite quickly that major releases are running at a pulse rate of once every 3 to 5 years. Perhaps interspersed by point releases, service packs or other patch or fix mechanisms, the major launches – often accompanied by fanfares and marketing effort – hit the streets twice or more each decade[1]. (Support for any given release will commonly run for longer).

Why does that matter?

This matters for one simple reason: Applications Mean Business. It means those platforms that need to be swapped out regularly house the most important IT assets the organization has, namely the core systems and data that run the business. These are the applications that must not fail, and which must continue into the future – and survive any underlying hardware change.

Failing to keep up with the pace of change has the potential of putting an organization at a competitive disadvantage, or potentially failing internal or regulatory audits. For example, Windows XP was retired as a mainstream product in 2009. Extended support was dropped in 2014. Yet it has 11% market share in 2016 source, according to netmarketshare.com (add the link). Therefore, business applications running on XP are, by definition, out of support, and may be in breach of internal or regulatory stipulations.

Time for a Change?

There is at least some merit in considering whether the old machinery being decommissioned would be a smart time to look at replacing the old systems which ran on those moribund servers. After all, those applications been around a while, and no-one typically has much kind to say about them except they never seem to break.

This is one view, but taking a broader perspective might illustrate the frailties of that approach –

  • First, swapping out applications is time-consuming and expensive. Rewriting or buying packages costs serious money and will take a long time to implement. Years rather than months, they will be an all-consuming and major IT project.
  • Questionable return is the next issue – by which we mean we are swapping out a perfectly good application set, for one which might do what is needed (the success rate of such replacement projects is notoriously low, failure rates of between 40 and 70% have been reported in the industry) And the new system? It is potentially the same system being used by a competitor.
  • Perhaps the most worrying issue of all is that this major undertaking is a single point in time, but as we have already stated, is that it is a cyclical activity. Platforms change frequently, so this isn’t a one-time situation, this is a repeated task. Which means it needs to be done cost-efficiently, without undue cost or risk.

platform2

Keep on Running

And here’s the funny thing, while there are very few constants in the IT world (operating systems, platforms, even people change over time), there are one or two technologies that have stood the test of time. COBOL as a language environment is the bedrock of business systems and is one of the very few technologies offering forward compatibility to ensure the same system can work from the past on today’s – and tomorrow’s – platforms.

Using the latest Micro Focus solutions, customers can use their old COBOL-based systems, unchanged, in today’s platform mix. And tomorrow too, whatever the platform strategy, those applications will run. In terms of cost and risk, taking what already works and moving it – unchanged – to a new environment, is about as low risk as it can get.

Very few technologies that have a decades-old heritage can get anywhere close to claiming that level of forwards-compatibility. Added to which no other technology is supported yesterday, today and tomorrow on such a comprehensive array of platforms.

The only constant is change. Except the other one: Micro Focus’ COBOL.

Platform3[1] Source: Micro Focus research

#MFSummit2016: product roadmaps and Tube maps

In the digital economy, our customers are contending with unprecedented user demand and an explosion of information to supply. We’re helping them build, operate and secure core IT services by building bridges between what works today and what is needed tomorrow. Here’s a personal reflection of my time at #MFSummit2016 in London.

To reach Prince Philip House, the venue for the inaugural Micro Focus customer conference, I had the choice of six different Tube lines. No wonder frequent users talk about the ‘complexity, cost and confusion’ of the London Underground.

Those problems end for most commuters when they get to work. For many of our customers, that is when they begin. As I explained in my keynote speech, innovation is both the culprit and the solution.

Recent disruptive technologies, including web, Cloud and mobile, are increasing opportunity and complexity in equal measure. Streamlining a process or delivering a new IT service, expanding core platforms, embracing new application technology, overhauling user interfaces, implementing new security controls … they all improve the customer experience while confusing the picture for the organisations.

Harry Beck knew how to express complicated systems in an attractive, linear way. So we drew inspiration from his finest work to map the scale of the complexity, cost and confusion facing our customers.

Tube

Platform alteration?

But these are only the known knowns. Like the London Underground, new lines are inevitable. So our first post-merger, cross-portfolio conference was a good opportunity to assess the challenges and set out our strategy to scale them. It was, after all, a summit.

Much of today’s business innovation is driven by consumer demand for the rapidly-evolving supply of information. These days we are all IT consumers with heightened expectations around access to refined information wherever we are, from our preferred device.

Meeting that demand adds to the complexity of already convoluted processes and the creation of confusing, disparate, heterogeneous systems. The cost is a given. These elements makes delivering effective innovation increasingly difficult just as demand is increasing.

But it can be done. Micro Focus enables its customers to innovate faster with lower risk by enabling them to embrace new technology while building on what already works, in essence bridging the old and the new.

So what does that mean for our customers? Put simply, we have assembled a portfolio focused on three primary capabilities; to build, operate and secure business-critical systems of applications and infrastructure.

MFsolutions

Our promise to customers is that they can innovate faster with lower risk. That means building the applications that meet the needs of the business today and tomorrow, operating data centers and business services with the best balance of cost, speed and risk and securing their data against the latest threats.

In summary

In his pre-conference blog, Andy King’s promise to delegates is that a visit to #MFSummit2016 would put them in a better position to navigate the challenges of business and IT change. The message seems to have resonated.

“As an application modernization consultant, I fully agree with the Micro Focus “bridging the old and the new” vision. Their Build technology is especially impressive and helps us deliver greater value, more quickly, to our customers”, Mike Madden, Director, Legacy IT.

RollsRoyce